Posted by: cherylyoung | June 29, 2015

Wonderland Tea….In Sidney BC

http://florierobwaller.wix.com/wonder-tea

Tickets are on sale at

norma jeans poster

wonderland

Honourable Shirley Bond

ShirleyBond

Shirley Bond was elected in 2001 and 2005 as the MLA

for Prince George-Mount Robson, and re-elected in 2009 and

2013 as the MLA for Prince George-Valemount.

Shirley was appointed Minister of Jobs, Tourism and

Skills Training and Minister Responsible for Labour on June 10, 2013.

In this role she will drive government’s commitment for job

creation and economic development by accelerating the

BC Jobs Plan and ensure that British Columbians are first

in line for the jobs of today and tomorrow by executing

on B.C.’s Skills for Jobs Blueprint, which will re-engineer

our education and training system.

She also works closely with Destination BC to meet

the targets laid out in the Province’s tourism strategy.

With more than 13 years of Cabinet experience,

Shirley has served as Deputy Premier, Minister of

Transportation and Infrastructure,

Minister of Education, Minister Responsible for

Early Learning and Literacy, Minister of Advanced Education,

Minister of Health Services, and was the first female to hold

the position of Attorney General in British Columbia,

a title she held while Minister of Justice.

Shirley currently serves as the Chair of the

Cabinet Committee on Strong Economy,

Vice Chair for the Core Review Committee and she

is a member of the Treasury Board and the Priorities

and Planning Committee.

Before her election to the Legislative Assembly,

she served three terms on the Prince George

School Board, the last as chair

She also worked with the continuing education department

of the Prince George School District, becoming

its business manager.

She was given the B.C. Interior, North & Yukon Woman

of Distinction Award for her work in public education.

Shirley lives in Prince George with Bill, her husband of

more than 30 years, and they love spending time

with their twin adult children

and their families, especially their grandsons,

Caleb and Cooper

bus card2

yamamotoN

MLA: Hon. Naomi Yamamoto

North Vancouver-Lonsdale

Minister of State for Tourism
and Small Business

Elected: 2009, 2013

BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBERAL PARTY

E-mail: naomi.yamamoto.mla@leg.bc.ca
Office:

Room 227
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, BC
V8V 1X4

Phone: 250 356-0946
Fax: 250 356-0948
   

Naomi Yamamoto was re-elected as MLA for

North Vancouver-Lonsdale and appointed

Minister of State for Tourism and Small

Business in 2013.

She is also a member of the Cabinet Committee

 on Strong Economy.

She has served as Minister of Advanced Education,

Minister of State for Intergovernmental Relations,

Minister of State  for Small Business and Minister

of State for Building Code Renewal.

Previously, Naomi was the president and

owner of Tora Design Group in North Vancouver

for 21 years.

 She also enjoyed working with the business

community as chair of the BC Chamber of Commerce,

chair of the North Shore Credit Union, and

representing the North Vancouver Chamber on

Vancouver’s North Shore Tourism Association

Board.

She served a six-year term on the board of

Capilano College (now Capilano University),

with the last three years as chair.

 She also enjoyed six years as a director of

 North Shore Neighbourhood House.

bus card2

Posted by: cherylyoung | June 17, 2015

Meet our Minister of State for Tourism and Small Business


yamamotoN

MLA: Hon. Naomi Yamamoto

North Vancouver-Lonsdale

Minister of State for Tourism
and Small Business

Elected: 2009, 2013

BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBERAL PARTY

<!–

–>

E-mail: naomi.yamamoto.mla@leg.bc.ca
<!–
Web site: http://www.naomiyamamotomla.bc.ca
–> <!–

<!–
Social Media:

<!–

<!–

Follow on Twitter   @naomiyamamoto
Follow on Facebook   naomi.yamamoto.mla

–>

Office:
Room 227
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, BC
V8V 1X4
Constituency:
5 – 221 West Esplanade
North Vancouver, BC
V7M 3J3
Phone: 250 356-0946 Phone: 604 981-0033
Fax: 250 356-0948 Fax: 604 981-0044
Toll free: 1 877 000-0000

Naomi Yamamoto was re-elected as MLA for North Vancouver-Lonsdale and appointed Minister of State for Tourism and Small Business in 2013. She is also a member of the Cabinet Committee on Strong Economy.

She has served as Minister of Advanced Education, Minister of State for Intergovernmental Relations, Minister of State for Small Business and Minister of State for Building Code Renewal.

Previously, Naomi was the president and owner of Tora Design Group in North Vancouver for 21 years. She also enjoyed working with the business community as chair of the BC Chamber of Commerce, chair of the North Shore Credit Union, and representing the North Vancouver Chamber on Vancouver’s North Shore Tourism Association Board.

She served a six-year term on the board of Capilano College (now Capilano University), with the last three years as chair. She also enjoyed six years as a director of North Shore Neighbourhood House.

bus card2


Having trouble reading our email? View it online.
Add
bigbike@hsf.on.ca to your address book.
Heart&Stroke - The Big Bike
Dear Cheryl,

It’s just 7 days until your Heart&Stroke Big Bike event. As the bike rolls toward your town, keep pushing on the fundraising as every dollar you raise helps to create survivors.

Here is a quick re-cap of 6 great ways to boost your fundraising total:

1. Personalize your page. Upload a photo and write a sentence explaining why you are fundraising for Big Bike. People will donate more when they know why you are riding.
2. Make a self-donation. Donate to yourself and ask others to follow. Give yourself $20 or $50 and just watch as others follow your good example. To do a Selfie now, visit your fundraising page.
3. Send an email to 10 friends. Use one of the templates in your fundraising HQ to quickly reach your friends and family.
4. Add a message to your email signature. Every time you send an email, the recipient knows that you are supporting the Heart and Stroke Foundation and they’ll be happy to support you. Here’s a sample you could use:

I’m riding the Heart&Stroke Big Bike. Please support the Heart and Stroke Foundation, and me, with a secure online donation at my fundraising page.

5. Fundraise with Facebook and Twitter. Tell your friends and followers why you are doing the Big Bike and ask them to support you. Don’t forget to include your fundraising URL in the post. You can also post direct from your Participant Centre to Facebook and Twitter.
6. Enter any Offline Donations. To upload any offline pledges you have received so they show up on your fundraising thermometer online, simply follow the steps below:

➢ Visit www.bigbike.ca
➢ Login to your personal page
➢ Click on “My tools”
➢ Click “Offline donations”
➢ Click “Enter pledge”
➢ Complete donation details
➢ Click “Submit” button

LOG IN TO FUNDRAISE NOW
Together we ride to create survivors.
Heart and Stroke Foundation Facebook Twitter Heart&Stroke Foundation
To ensure delivery to your inbox, please add bigbike@hsf.on.ca to your address book.
Your email address is
cbythesea@shaw.ca | Unsubscribe
Your province is: BC and your area office is: Vancouver Island
222 Queen Street, Suite 1402 Ottawa, Ontario, K1P 5V9 |
www.bigbike.ca

We are committed to protecting the privacy of your personal information. We may maintain a record of your interaction for donor-related, promotion and tax receipting purposes, where required. Occasionally, we may contact you with mission-related or program related communications. If you wish no further contact or have any questions or concerns regarding the privacy of your personal information, please contact the Chief Privacy Officer, at your provincial Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada office at 1-888-HSF-INFO (473-4636) or through www.heartandstroke.ca/privacy

© 2015 Heart and Stroke Foundation

Originally posted on Cheryl Young's Blog:

 The bustling, vibrant, center of the action in Victoria.

 Stroll along the waterfront and enjoy the many street

 musicians, jugglers, and artists, all against a

picturesque backdrop of yachts, the legislature

 buildings,  and the  Fairmont Empress Hotel.

Whether you’re looking for a whale watching adventure,

 kayak rental, or just to sample the many wonderful

cafes, pubs, and restaurants, you’ll find it on

 Victoria’s beautiful  Inner Harbour.

Walk past the Port Angeles ferry terminal on Belleville

 St., watching for a small pathway on your right.

 This peaceful, paved walkway follows the waterfront,

 winding past the gardens and ponds of the Laurel

Point Inn and Coast Hotel.

 Relax on a bench to watch the tugboats and floatplanes

 drift by.

From the Coast Hotel you can stroll through quaint

 James Bay for a few blocks to the cruise ship docks

 for an up-close view of these floating palaces.

Stop at Fisherman’s Wharf to see the funky…

View original 235 more words

Posted by: cherylyoung | May 19, 2015

Rouyn, Noranda my birthplace

Fermer

Abitibi-Témiscamingue inusitée

Le restaurant Dick Woo Radio Grill : symbole passé de la communauté chinoise de Rouyn-Noranda

Mise à jour le mardi 19 mai 2015 à 4 h 59 HAP
Le restaurant Radio Grill, à Rouyn-Noranda (archives)Le restaurant Radio Grill, à Rouyn-Noranda (archives)  Photo :  BAnQ Rouyn-Noranda
« Je vais te dire une affaire, nous autres, on faisait beaucoup de riz! Alors, le chicken fried rice, c’était le main dish. Et les clients demandaient des toasts avec ça! C’était le mets principal. » — Dick Woo Jr

La communauté chinoise a déjà été très importante à Rouyn-Noranda. Le restaurant Dick Woo Radio Grill en a été le symbole. L’établissement a marqué l’imaginaire collectif et la culture culinaire locale. La proximité immédiate du restaurant avec l’hôtel Radio, haut lieu de la musique rock dans les années 50 et 60, a aussi conféré au Radio Grill une aura légendaire pour ses fins de soirées festives… très festives!

Mai est le mois du patrimoine asiatique. C’était donc l’occasion de revenir sur l’histoire du restaurant Dick Woo Radio Grill qui a marqué Rouyn-Noranda.

Un article de Félix B. DesfossésTwitterCourriel

« Mon père est arrivé ici en 1936, de Saskatchewan. Il est né en Chine, mais à l’âge de 3 ou 4 ans, il est déménagé en Saskatchewan », raconte Dick Woo Jr., fils de Dick Woo Sr., fondateur et propriétaire du Radio Grill.

« [Sa famille] allait en Colombie-Britannique pour les chemins de fer. […] Mon père m’a [raconté] que les Chinois qui travaillaient sur le chemin de fer gagnaient une piastre par jour. Ils travaillaient fort… pas des 8 heures! Ils travaillaient très fort. Il y avait beaucoup de discrimination. Mais, tu sais… on l’a fait! Aujourd’hui, je parle avec toi! » — Dick Woo Jr.

Au cours de la décennie 1880, plus de 15 000 Chinois sont arrivés au Canada pour travailler à la construction du chemin de fer du Canadien Pacifique. Le père de Dick Woo, cantonais d’origine, était l’un d’eux.

Au milieu des années 30, durant la grande dépression, plusieurs personnes cherchaient à améliorer leurs conditions de vie, à sortir de la misère. C’est dans ce contexte que Dick Woo « a entendu dire qu’il y avait ici la mine Noranda par ses copains chinois. Il est venu ici pour vivre mieux, parce que dans l’Ouest, c’était la dépression », raconte son fils.

À son arrivée à Rouyn-Noranda, Dick Woo lance le restaurant New Horne Grill sur la rue Principale. L’établissement est la proie des flammes en 1949.

1 / 2

Plein écran

Dick Woo Radio Grill

1 / 9

Plein écran

Dick Woo se retrousse les manches et lance le Radio Grill dans le sous-sol de l’hôtel Radio, à l’extrémité nord de la rue Principale. Le succès est au rendez-vous. Le Radio Grill devient un restaurant familial très apprécié. Dick Woo est devenu un homme d’affaires bien en vue et très impliqué dans sa communauté.

Le riz frit au poulet est le mets le plus populaire sur le menu. Et, étrangement, le Radio Grill avait comme coutume de servir des rôties aux clients pour accompagner son riz frit.

Fait inusité, l’agencement du riz frit au poulet avec « un ordre de toasts » a fait école. C’est maintenant une tradition entretenue dans plusieurs chaumières de la région!

1 / 4

Plein écran

Le nightlife de Rouyn-Noranda

Pour connaître l’origine de la coutume toast et riz frit, certains croient qu’il faut se tourner vers la clientèle de nuit du Radio Grill.

Pendant de nombreuses années, le Radio Grill était ouvert 24 heures sur 24. Son voisin immédiat, l’hôtel Radio, lui offrait donc une clientèle tout au long de la soirée et de la nuit. C’est que l’hôtel n’offrait pas que des chambres. À cette époque, les hôtels de Rouyn-Noranda – et d’un peu partout ailleurs – avaient tous un bar où des orchestres étaient engagés pour donner des spectacles. L’hôtel Radio était particulièrement reconnu pour ses concerts de rock’n’roll.

« C’était la fête toutes les fins de semaine », se souvient Dick Woo. La clientèle éméchée de l’hôtel Radio descendait donc au Radio Grill pour manger un riz frit au poulet en fin de soirée. De la même manière que les fêtards vont aujourd’hui au restaurant Chez Morasse pour manger une poutine à la sortie des bars.

D’ailleurs, The Jades, un groupe formé à Rouyn-Noranda, habitué de l’hôtel Radio, a composé et enregistré vers 1963 une chanson intitulée Chicken Fried Rice. Le chanteur du groupe y raconte que tous les soirs, quand il sort en ville, lui et sa copine terminent la soirée en mangeant un riz frit au poulet. Il s’agit d’un véritable témoignage musical du nightlife rouynorandien des années 60.

Selon certains, aux petites heures du matin, la clientèle venue pour déjeuner et la clientèle sortie des bars se mélangeaient au Radio Grill. Ne sachant plus qui venait déjeuner ou qui venait terminer sa soirée, l’établissement aurait commencé à servir des rôties systématiquement à tous ses clients. Et l’agencement des toasts et du riz frit aurait tellement été populaire que la recette aurait été adoptée par le restaurant et sa clientèle.

Par contre, Dick Woo Jr. ne peut confirmer cette hypothèse. « Ça se peut que ce soit un mélange des deux. Dans ce temps-là, le Radio Grill… 24 heures sur 24! Ça roulait jour et nuit. Chaque après-midi, quand l’école Noranda High School avait fini l’école, ça courait jusqu’au Radio Grill parce que ce n’était pas loin. Et l’été, il y avait des jam sessions. Sacrifice! Les orchestres jouaient tout le temps, en haut au Radio hotel. »

Dick Woo, as du kung-fu?

Dick Woo SrDick Woo Sr

Et à propos de la clientèle nocturne du Radio Grill, Dick Woo Jr. continue : « Je vais te dire une affaire. Tu sais, l’Ontario, ce n’est pas loin. Kirkland Lake, New Liskeard… eux autres sont venus ici pour s’amuser parce qu’ici, les bars fermaient plus tard qu’en Ontario. On avait beaucoup d’activités… de batailles, le soir. Et mon père était dans ça! […] Pour calmer le jeu. Dans ce temps-là, quand lui était jeune, il avait pris [des cours] de kung-fu à l’âge de 5 ou 6 ans. Assez pour se défendre seulement. Quand il y avait du monde qui venait au restaurant pour faire un peu de problèmes, ben mon père vient et puis… Mon père était à peu près de ma grandeur, mais lui, il avait une affaire que la famille avait : le kung-fu. Il y avait juste les prêtres qui savaient ça dans l’ouest. Alors les prêtres ont montré ça aux enfants, comment se défendre.

Dick Woo Sr a donc parfois eu à s’interposer dans des escarmouches entre clients avec ses techniques de kung-fu pour calmer les esprits!

La communauté chinoise de Rouyn-Noranda

Banquet au Radio Grill suite à un mariage dans la communauté chinoise de Rouyn-NorandaBanquet au Radio Grill suite à un mariage dans la communauté chinoise de Rouyn-Noranda  Photo :  Archives Dick Woo Jr

L’histoire du Radio Grill n’est qu’une parmi tant d’autres. Selon Dick Woo, à une certaine époque, au moins 11 restaurants chinois ont eu pignon sur rue à Rouyn-Noranda. Il cite notamment le Yung Cafe à Noranda, l’Hollywood Cafe, le Paris Cafe et la Pagode, qui appartenait également à Dick Woo.

« Il y avait comme une communauté chinoise. Eux autres restaient sur [la rue] Mgr Tessier. On disait que ça, c’était le village chinois de Rouyn-Noranda parce qu’il y en avait trois ou quatre qui avaient déménagé là. Et à chaque occasion, tous les Chinois étaient unis ensemble. Quand un restaurant avait un problème, on s’aide, puis après on continue à faire notre travail », relate Dick Woo Jr.

Plusieurs membres de la communauté chinoise ont quitté Rouyn-Noranda. Les plus jeunes pour étudier. Avec les années, une nouvelle communauté chinoise s’est établie dans le secteur. Ces nouveaux arrivants, souvent des étudiants, gravitent autour de l’Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue. Dick Woo Jr. et son père ont vécu toute leur vie à Rouyn. Leur héritage familial fait partie de la culture populaire du secteur.

« J’vais te dire une affaire. Moi, je suis bien content. J’ai travaillé pour mon père. Puis, tout d’un coup, j’ai dit à mon père : “Je m’en vais”. J’ai été travailler quatre ans [à l’extérieur de la ville]. Puis, quand j’ai vu les cheminées de la mine… home sweet home! Ce n’était pas mieux ailleurs qu’ici. J’ai fait ma vie ici, j’ai élevé mes enfants ici, ma famille. Je me suis intégré. Les gens m’agacent… ils me crient : “Hé, le chinois!”, mais c’est juste des farces. Non, je suis bien ici. » — Dick Woo Jr.
Dick Woo Jr., 2015Dick Woo Jr., 2015

Important Afin de favoriser des discussions riches, respectueuses et constructives, chaque commentaire soumis sur les tribunes de Radio-Canada.ca sera dorénavant signé des nom(s) et prénom(s) de son auteur (à l’exception de la zone Jeunesse). Le nom d’utilisateur (pseudonyme) ne sera plus affiché.

En nous soumettant vos commentaires, vous reconnaissez que Radio-Canada a le droit de les reproduire et de les diffuser, en tout ou en partie et de quelque manière que ce soit. Veuillez noter que Radio-Canada ne cautionne pas les opinions exprimées. Vos commentaires seront modérés, et publiés s’ils respectent la nétiquette. Bonne discussion !

Originally posted on Cheryl Young's Blog:

Princess Royal Island is located amongst the

 isolated inlets and islands of Canada’s forgotten

 coast, in the heart of the world famous Great

 Bear Rainforest.

 This is an extremely remote area of British

 Columbia, 520 kilometers north of Vancouver and

200 kilometers south of Prince Rupert, accessible

 only by boat or air.

Aside from the Tsimshiam, who once inhabited a

 coastal village on the island but now no longer live

here, almost no people have entered the inland

 rainforest of Princess Royal Island.

Princess Royal Island is best known as being home

 to the legendary white Kermode Bear, Spirit Bear

of the North Coast of British Columbia.

These magnificent bears are not found anywhere

else in the entire world.

The Kermode bear (Ursus americanus “kermodei”)

 is a beautiful white bear that is only found in the

 rain forests of the north coast of British Columbia.

 The Kermode bear is not…

View original 950 more words

Originally posted on Cheryl Young's Blog:

The young and vibrant community of Campbell River

 on the east coast of central Vancouver Island is

 beautifully set between Strathcona Park to the west

 and the Discovery Islands to the east, a

 metropolitan town located on the frontier of a BC

 wilderness, inhabited by few people but many

 animals.

 Long known as the Salmon Capital of the World,

 Campbell River is a natural destination, in more

 ways than one.

Campbell River is big as Vancouver Island cities go.

The town hosts a busy arts and culture scene, and is

 completely ringed with shopping malls, yet the city

 centre still looks and feels as it probably did in

 the ’50s.

Campbell River is located in a region rich in natural

 resources.

The towering West Coast forests have fostered a

 growing forestry industry, from logging companies

 to pulp mills and sawmill operations.

Mining is another active industry in Campbell

River, with…

View original 519 more words

Originally posted on Cheryl Young's Blog:

Known locally as The Ragged Group, the 437-hectare

 Copeland Islands Marine Provincial Park

archipelago comprises four of the islands and 14

 islets that protect narrow Thulin Passage, the main

 passageway for boats and kayakers travelling between

 the Discovery Islands and Desolation Sound.

Wilderness camping and fabulous kayaking attracts

 outdoor enthusiasts to this group of small, moss

 covered rocky islands.

 Other leisure pursuits in the area include swimming,

 fishing, snorkelling and scuba diving.

The Copeland Islands and Savary Island lie offshore

 from Lund on the Malaspina Peninsula of the

 Sunshine Coast.

You can see the white sandy beaches of Savary

 beckoning in the distance, while the Copelands lie

 out of sight to the north, 2 kilometres northwest

 of Lund and southwest of Bliss Landing.

Paddlers wishing to reach the Copelands should head

 north from Lund, hugging the steep-sided coastline.

 Marine traffic in Thulin Passage can kick up quite

 a sizeable chop…

View original 231 more words

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,677 other followers

%d bloggers like this: