Posted by: cherylyoung | February 22, 2011

I’m going to tell you a secret about fly fishing

Forming its headwaters in a region studded

 with picturesque coves, beaches, islands,

rock cliffs, waterfalls, coniferous forests

 and the snow-capped Cascade Mountains,

the Harrison River is often overlooked by

serious anglers.

 

Perhaps it’s because there are so many

distractions in this magnificent region, just

90 minutes by car from Vancouver, British

Columbia – from the world-class amenities

at Harrison Hot Springs Resort to the full

range of backcountry adventure options in

pristine wilderness settings.

 

Whatever the reason for the oversight, it’s

a delicious secret: fishing in the Harrison

 River is nothing short of incredible.

Thousands of Chinook, Coho, chum, pink

and sockeye salmon, fresh from the ocean,

spawn each year in the short stretch of the

 Harrison River.

 

From mid-August to December the main

channel of the Harrison River and the

 Weaver Creek spawning channel are

 crammed with the brilliant red and green

flashes of mating salmon.

 

If you’re lucky enough to fish the Harrison

 River during this prolific season, likely your

only company will be a plentiful assortment

of bald eagles, since the Harrison region is a

prime winter feeding and resting area for

these normally reclusive raptors.

 

Salmon begin migrating into the Harrison

River as early as June.

 

These early fish swim up the Harrison River,

through Harrison Lake and into the Lillooet

River, which boasts one of the earliest salmon

runs in the area, not to mention a remarkable

 world-class, year-round trout fishery.

As summer progresses sockeye salmon

 enter the Harrison River, destined for

Morris Creek and the Weaver Creek

 Spawning channel.

 

Because the spawning channels are only a

10-kilometer (6-mile) swim up the Harrison

 River, it doesn’t take the fish long to reach

their home.

 

As a result, most sockeye remain in the

 Harrison River until they are ready to spawn,

creating prime opportunities for observant

 anglers.

Shortly after the sockeye enter the river, the

summer and fall runs of Chinook salmon

 follow.

 

These great fish, also known as king salmon,

yarget the deep-water pools of the Harrison

 River as their prime holding water.

 

During this same period, the Chehalis River,

 a tributary of the Harrison, is also inundated

with summer and fall runs of salmon and

steelhead.

 

By late summer, pink, Coho and chum salmon

fill both rivers.

 

 It’s as if you can walk across the river on

the backs of the salmon, there are so

 many fish.

 

The salmon come back every year in such

abundance for good reason.

 

With its crystal clear water, spectacular

mountains and abundance of salmon,

sturgeon and trout, the Harrison River flows

through an amazingly rich watershed.

 

For more than a decade, STS Guiding Service

has been one of the region’s premiere guide

 and tour operators.

 

 Among the many adventures offered by this

 full-service company is a fall tour of the

Pretty Flats area, where hundreds of bald

eagles converge to feed on the spawning

salmon.

STS offers a rich variety of fishing, bird-

watching and wildlife-viewing tour packages,

 showcasing the region’s many natural

highlights and attractions.

 

Be sure to book your trip well in advance …

 and remember, this is our little secret.

 

CHERYL C YOUNG, REALTOR

SAANICH PENINSULA REALTY

SIDNEY B.C www.cherylyoung.ca

business card

I’m not just about Real Estate, check

out my pages on things to do for kids…

 

 

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Responses

  1. Reblogged this on Cheryl Young's Blog.


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