Posted by: cherylyoung | February 10, 2012

Today we continue featuring the Gulf Island in B.C

Today we continue featuring the Gulf Island in B.C

Cormorant island off the Northeast Coast of Vancouver

Island is the  traditional home of the ‘Namgis

First Nation.

They used the island as a place to bring their people who had

passed on, and also lived on the Island on a seasonal basis for

several  thousand years.

Cormorant Island boasts the North Island’s oldest community, the

fishing village of Alert Bay, which was an important trading

centre for early  residents in the area.

Alert Bay and Cormorant Island have an interesting history.

Captain George Vancouver anchored his vessel, the HMS Discover,

at Xwalkw  (mouth of the ‘Namgis River) in the late 1700s.

Cormorant Island is  named after the HMS Cormorant, a coastal

paddle sloop operating in the  area in 1846.

Cormorant Island is very small, being only 4 kilometres long and

measuring roughly 1 kilometre in width at the narrowest point of

the island.

Today, this island fishing community hosts some of the region’s

finest  historical and cultural artifacts.

In addition to enjoying the rich cultural heritage of Cormorant

Island, visitors can enjoy many activities such as whale

watching,eco-tours  kayaking, hiking and biking.

Population: 1,275

Location: Cormorant Island is located off the northeast coast of
Vancouver  Island, easily accessible by a scenic ferry ride from the
community of Port McNeill on Vancouver Island to the island’s
busy harbour at Alert Bay.
Alert Bay is the main settlement on Cormorant Island, offering
visitors a variety of historical attractions and outdoor activities.
Cormorant Island boasts over 10.5 kilometres of both hiking and

biking  trails to explore.

Wildlife: Cormorant Island’s surrounding waterways are home to

Killer Whales, Sea Lions, Porpoises and Dolphins.

Close to Alert Bay in Johnstone Strait is the largest concentration

of Killer whales in the world at Robson Bight Ecological Reserve,

where up to 200 Orcas arrive each summer to rub on gravel

beaches at the mouth of the Tsitika River. Whale watching

companies based in Alert Bay, Port McNeill, Sointula,

Telegraph Cove, Sayward and Port Hardy all operate tours to

Robson Bight.

To the northeast of Cormorant Island across the Labouchere

Passage is the  Broughton Archipelago Marine Park, a wilderness

area consisting of a maze  of several small islands, numerous

inlets and adjacent foreshore at the  southern extremity of

Queen Charlotte Strait, off the west coast of Gilford  Island.

The islands in the marine park are undeveloped and are largely

undiscovered.

Facilities are limited to a day-use recreation.

The numerous remote, solitary islands incorporated in the park

provide unlimited and unique fishing and swimming

opportunities, and are fabulous for exploring by kayak.

Cormorant Channel Marine Provincial Park

is located on either side of Weynton Pass in the Cormorant

Channel, due east of Alert Bay.

Fishing: Blackfish Sound east of Cormorant Island is productive for

salmon  fishing, offering feeder chinooks throughout the year.

The first migratory chinooks appear in late May through to

August, followed by the sockeye (June to August), pinks

(July to August), coho in  mid July, northern coho in September

and chum salmon from late August  through to October.

Winter chinook end off the year by passing through toward the end

of  December.

Halibut fishing commences in April to June, and continues

through the  summer to September – open water depths of 200 to

400 feet are most  productive.

Concentrate on Richards Channel, Ripple Passage and Bolivar

Passage.

Halibut around the 100 lb mark are brought in regularly, with

monsters  of over 200 lbs caught occasionally.

Immediately north of Cormorant Island across Cormorant

Channel is Malcolm Island, location of the small, picturesque

fishing village of Sointula.

B.C. Ferries operates a ferry service from Port McNeill on northeast

Vancouver Island to Alert Bay and Sointula.

Island Hopping: Travelling between the Southern Gulf Islands and

Northern Gulf Islands can be accomplished in small hops.

Each of these islands is a world unto itself, each with its own

history, culture and colourful characters – each island deserves at 

least a day or two for exploring.

UNLESS YOU HAVE BEEN LIVING IN ANOTHER UNIVERSE YOU

HAVE HEARD ALL THE BUZZ ABOUT OUR BC WINES.

NEXT WEEK WILL BE REVIEWING SOME ON THESE AND WE WILL

START WITH THE WINES OF THE FRASER VALLEY

CHERYL YOUNG, REALTOR.

SAANICH PENINSULA REALTY

VICTORIA BC.  www.cherylyoung.ca

 

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