Posted by: cherylyoung | April 29, 2012

EVERYONE WILL AGREE THAT A TRIP TO VICTORIA WOULD NOT BE COMPLET WITHOUT SEEING THE HISTORIC EMILY CARR HOUSE

EVERYONE WILL AGREE THAT A TRIP

TO VICTORIA BC, WOULD NOT ME

COMPLETE WITHOUT SEEING THE

HERITAGE EMILY CARR HOUSE.

With an architecture described as both

 ”San Francisco Victorian” and “English Gingerbread,”

 all agree that the heritage Emily Carr House is on

 the must-see list of attractions in Victoria.

Centrally located only four blocks from Victoria’s

 Inner Harbour and the Provincial Legislature

 buildings, Emily Carr House offers its visitors a

 chance to gain an insight into Canada’s first, and

best known, independent artist and writer.

Emily Carr was born here in 1871, a scant six months

after British Columbia moved from British colonial

status to becoming a province of the world’s newest

 nation.

 She used her brushes and pens to proclaim her pride

 in this part of Canada for the rest of her life.

Emily developed a passion for nature, animals and

art, and at age seventeen studied painting first in

 San Francisco and later in Paris and London.

After teaching art to children in Vancouver, she

returned to Victoria in 1913 and built the

 ”House of All Sorts”, a boarding house for anyone

 who needed shelter.

 She undertook a series of ambitious journeys into

the remote wilderness, visited isolated native villages,

and drew inspiration from the hundreds of sketches

 and water-colours she brought back from

 these journeys.

Millie, as she was known to her family and friends

 started writing in her later years as her health failed.

In 1941 she published her novel Klee Wyck which won

 the Governor’s General’s Award.

She wrote several other best sellers, including

 The Book of Small and The Heart of a Peacock.

 Emily Carr died on March 2 1945 and was buried

on the Carr Family plot at the Ross Bay Cemetery

 in Victoria.

In the restored rooms of the house, built in 1864,

 you’ll enter into the same Victorian ambiance the

 Carr family would have known in the 1870s, and

 upstairs are several of their actual possessions,

including some of Emily’s pottery and sculpture.

One room is now used as the “People’s Gallery” to

 present the work of Canadian artists, and at the rear

 of the house a small gift shop offers a remarkably

varied selection of items produced by Victoria

artists and potters.

Emily Carr House is near the Inner Harbour

 of Victoria, at 207 Government Street, only a

 10-minute walk south from the Royal B.C. Museum

 and the Legislative Buildings.

The house is open to the general public from May to

September; Tuesday to Saturday from 10 am to 4 pm.

 Admission fees are in effect.

 Special openings are scheduled at other times of the

 year, especially in December.

Contact details:
Emily Carr House
207 Government Street
Victoria
B.C. V8V 2K3

Telephone: (250) 383-5843
Fax: (250) 356-7796

business card

CHERYL C YOUNG, REALTOR

SAANICH PENINSULA REALTY

SIDNEY B.C www.cherylyoung.ca

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Responses

  1. Reblogged this on Cheryl Young's Blog.


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