Posted by: cherylyoung | October 3, 2012

The Sunshine Coast Trail has a superb view of the city of Powell River and nearby islands like Texda and Savary

Powell River offers unlimited variety for hikers, from oceanfront

strolls to backcountry treks.

The 180km/111mi Sunshine Coast Trail is the best-known hiking

trail in the region, and can easily be explored in smaller sections.

Other hikes provide more opportunities for wildlife-watching

and checking out local vegetation.

Many trails are maintained by the Bloody Old Men’s Brigade

(also known as the BOMB Squad), a group of retired local men

who volunteer their time and energy.

The Sunshine Coast Trail, founded in 1992, meanders south from

Sarah Point on Desolation Sound (north of the village of Lund) to

Saltery Bay on Jervis Inlet (where ferries travel to Earl’s Cove

on the lower Sunshine Coast).

With ocean views, old-growth forest, bridges, and bluffs, the

terrain is engagingly diverse, and ranges from moderate to

challenging.

Between Sarah Point and Malaspina Road, don’t miss the swimming

and camping at Wednesday Lake Watershed. Farther south,

between Fiddlehead Farm and Eagle River, admire the views

from Tinhat Mountain and pick blueberries in the summer.

Campsites and toilets are located along the trail, and B&Bs can also

be accessed.

The official recreation map for the upper Sunshine Coast

(available at the Powell River Visitor Centre) suggests nearly 30

separate sections of the Sunshine Coast Trail for exploration.

Inland Lake Provincial Park

Individuals with disabilities will find incredible hiking at

Inland Lake Provincial Park.

A 13km/8mi trail that is fully wheelchair-accessible encircles

the lake.

The circuit includes boardwalks, bridges, and a crushed

limestone path.

Check out the totem poles by carvers Terry Chapman and Jackie

Timothy, and if so inclined, participate in canoeing, biking, or

fishing at this 2,763ha/6,828ac park, which sits about 12km

/7.5mi north of Powell River.

Valentine Mountain

Located near Cranberry Lake and Powell Lake, Valentine

Mountain offers a nice, short uphill climb, including 90-odd

wooden steps.

The payoff? Superb views of the city of Powell River and nearby

islands like Texada Island and Savary Island.

Picnic tables grace the summit as well.

Willingdon Beach Trail

The 1230m/4000ft Willingdon Beach Trail located on the Powell

River waterfront takes about half an hour to hike each way.

In addition to gazing across the sweeping waters of Malaspina

Strait, hikers can admire culturally modified trees and shell

middens along the shore, reflecting the activity of the original

First Nations inhabitants.

Watch for gulls, cormorants, and harbour seals. Courtesy of the

Powell River Forestry Museum, various pieces of logging

equipment are stationed along the trail, including a steam donkey,

a bulldozer, and an antique fire pump.
More Area Hiking

To truly bring the hiking experience alive, visitors can hire a

local guide.

One reputable firm based in nearby Lund is Terracentric

Adventures (1451B Hwy. 101).

While hiking the Hurtado Point Trail, for instance, guides explain

the traditional uses of local flora like salal berries and skunk

cabbage, point out geographic landmarks, and explain the origin

of place names.

(Sarah Point, for instance, was named after explorer George

Vancouver’s sister.)

For more information about hiking the upper Sunshine Coast,

contact the Powell River Visitor Centre (#111-4871 Joyce Ave.

at the Crossroads Village Shopping Centre).

The Visitor Centre sells an in-depth guide to the Sunshine Coast

by Eagle Walz, a founder of the Powell River Parks and

Wilderness Society.

Cheryl C Young, Realtor

Saanich Peninsula Realty

Victoria B.C  www.cherylyoung.ca

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: